Posts by Roger Brewin

"How We Live Out Our Humanism, part II" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today!

We are pleased to announce the publication of our latest edition of the UUHA's official publication, the Journal of Religious Humanism. Paid UUHA members should receive a digital copy of the journal via email today.

Our latest issue of the journal is "How We Live Out Our Humanism, Part II" Read more about "How We Live Out Our Humanism, part II" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today! »

“How We Live Out Our Humanism, Part II” Vol 50 #1 of the journal Religious Humanism, will be available to UUHA members, mid-December, 2022.

“How We Live Out Our Humanism, Part II” Vol 50 #1 of the journal Religious Humanism, will be available to UUHA members, mid-December, 2022.

“I was in philosophy class … when the professor asked how many of us believed we could have a moral world without Christianity. I alone raised my hand,” writes Beth Lefever, “and then said that I didn’t believe Jesus would be a Christian were he here today. I was not very popular in my (conservative) northern Indiana university,” she adds, beginning a heart-felt account of her journey to UU Humanism and to parish ministry.

“The number one question for me, as a Secular Humanist, has been what should my role be in an organization that, while seeking to help the Mosou (one of the last remaining matriarchal societies, in a remote region of China) will inevitably change them, also.” John Lombard explains how the humanist value of choice allows him to grant agency without telling the Mosou what to do or how to do it. Read more about “How We Live Out Our Humanism, Part II” Vol 50 #1 of the journal Religious Humanism, will be available to UUHA members, mid-December, 2022. »

Arguing Abortion in a Post-Roe America

This op-ed was written by The Rev. Dr. Lucas Hergert, minister of the North Shore Unitarian Church in Deerfield, Illinois. He will teach Ethics at Meadville Lombard Theological School during the coming academic year.  

SOURCE: Oxford University PressHow do Unitarian Universalists and other religious and secular progressives frame a response to the demise of Roe v. Wade? Kate Greasley’s book Arguments about Abortion: Personhood, Morality, and Law (2017) offers a thorough defense of the pro-choice position. Written before the Supreme Court scuttled Roe, Greasley’s justification for abortion rights is newly useful. The work proffers important tools both to thoughtful readers interested in secular moral reasoning as well as pro- choice activists who wish to make their case. Read more about Arguing Abortion in a Post-Roe America »

"How We Live Out Our Humanism" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today!

We are pleased to announce the publication of our latest edition of the UUHA's official publication, the Journal of Religious Humanism. Paid UUHA members should receive a digital copy of the journal via email today.

Our latest issue of the journal is "How We Live Out Our Humanism"

In this issue we prompt our superb contributors to “tell us about your Humanist group’s community service, or an unusual family tradition, or an occasional gathering of friends to pursue a common passion, or an individual quest that reflects the best of humanism as you know it.” The results are an eclectic mix of impassioned reports on the work of Humanist communities and social justice organizations, along with deeply personal reflections on family, service to others and the human condition.

 

Religious Humanism Journal: Call for Submissions

We hope all UUHA members enjoyed our most recent edition of the Journal of Religious Humanism. The time has already come for our journal editors to plan for our first issue of the new year. If you have ever been interested in submitting an article for our journal, we have your next opportunity:

Theme for Vol. 49, Issue 2:

How We Live Out Our Humanism

We are looking for stories of how your life is impacted by your humanist values - something that you “do” that expresses your humanist identity. Examples might include personal commitments, relationship building, or communal endeavors.

Tell us about your Humanist group’s community service, or an unusual family tradition; an occasional gathering of friends to pursue a common passion, or a solitary quest that reflects the best of humanism as you understand it. Read more about Religious Humanism Journal: Call for Submissions »

"Doubt & Mystery: A Humanist Calendar" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today!

We are pleased to announce the publication of our latest edition of the UUHA's official publication, the Journal of Religious Humanism. Paid UUHA members should receive a digital copy of the journal via email today.

Our latest issue of the journal is "Doubt and Mystery: A Humanist Calendar."

This issue explores one means of ritualizing those very human emotions—a calendar of humanist holidays—regular opportunities for exploring that difficult but worthwhile goal, linking our appreciation of the mysteries of life and of the Cosmos, with our natural skepticism.

 

Religious Humanism Journal: Call for Submissions - "Doubt and Mystery"

We hope all UUHA members enjoyed our most recent edition of the Journal of Religious Humanism. The time has already come for our journal editors to plan for our first issue of the new year. If you have ever been interested in submitting an article for our journal, we have your next opportunity:

Theme for Vol. 49, Issue 1:

Doubt and Mystery: UU Humanist Ritual and Celebration

Built around a common calendar of observances, values and practices, this issue will explore such questions as: What does the new age of Secularism and Humanism offer to UU individuals and communities? What does UU religious diversity and polity offer to Humanism? Can an atheist UUism grow and thrive, and how might that happen? What and how should Humanists celebrate? Read more about Religious Humanism Journal: Call for Submissions - "Doubt and Mystery" »

"Elevator Speeches" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today!

We are pleased to announce the publication of our latest edition of the UUHA's official publication, the Journal of Religious Humanism. Paid UUHA members should receive a digital copy of the journal via email today.

Our latest issue of the journal is "Humanist Elevator Speeches."  Read more about "Elevator Speeches" Edition of Religious Humanism Journal Available to Members Today! »

Submissions Sought: Humanist Elevator Speeches

We humanists love to talk and explain (and then sum up, before adding footnotes!) …but brevity can sometimes be better. The Journal of Religious Humanism challenges you to be creatively brief. If you were asked, upon entering an elevator: “Hey, what is Humanism, anyway?” And you had to reply before exiting, what would you say?

In one floor? A dozen words or fewer? Example: “Wonder, imagination, fulfillment, creativity, meaning: available to everyone – religious or not.” Marilyn Westfall

In four floors? No more than 50 words? Example: “Humanism tells me human life is … worthy of respect and care. Environmentalism tells me: to be human is to be part of an interdependent circle of all life. Environmental Humanism compels me to … reduce human practices that threaten the survival of life on earth.” Carol Hepokoski

In twelve floors? 100 words, tops? Read more about Submissions Sought: Humanist Elevator Speeches »

Dedication of “Ribbons Not Walls” display at Brevard UU Church, April 2, 2017

“Ribbons” consists of twenty four fabric art panels from over 40 artists around the country. Some are based on themes or cover art from books by Hispanic authors; others directly represent aspects of the immigrant experience.  “Ribbons” was displayed at the UUA General Assemblies in Louisville, KY (2013), Providence, RI (2014), Portland, OR (2015) and Columbus, OH (2016).  In between, panels have traveled to over 60 venues (UU congregations, Humanist meetings, art galleries, etc), and have been viewed by over 14,000 people.  More than 200 individuals (mostly UUs and humanists) have been involved in the  fabrication, curation, display and financial sponsorship of the exhibit.

Following four years on the road, and the wear and tear of being repeatedly set up and taken down, “Ribbons” is transitioning to permanent sites around the country.  These four panels are now on display at the Brevard UU Church, 2185 Meadowlane Ave, West Melbourne, FL  32904: 

Read more about Dedication of “Ribbons Not Walls” display at Brevard UU Church, April 2, 2017 »

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