Posts by Maria Greene

When Colorblindness Isn't The Answer -- A Discussion Guide

Anthony Pinn’s new book, When Colorblindness Isn’t The Answer: Humanism and the Challenge of Race (order your copy today at Pitchstone Publishing or Amazon), provides an instructive manual for humanists seeking to bridge the gap between humanist theory and praxis when it comes to racial justice. You can read a book review here. Read more about When Colorblindness Isn't The Answer -- A Discussion Guide »

William R. Murry, In Memorium

It is with great sadness that we have learned of the death of Bill Murry. You may read his obituary here. A few weeks ago, he was the recipient of our Lifetime Achievement Award for all that he has done for the UU Humanists and for Unitarian Universalism over the years. He was a personal mentor for so many of us on the UUHA board and much beloved. We will miss you greatly, Bill. Read more about William R. Murry, In Memorium »

2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Bill Murry and Tony Pinn (with Video)

The UU Humanist Association's 2017 Annual Meeting was held on Friday, June 23 at UUA General Assembly in New Orleans, Louisiana. About eighty people made the trek from the Convention Center to the Hilton Riverside hotel, primarily drawn by the desire to congratulate and hear from our two awardees, the Rev. Dr. William R. Murry and Dr. Anthony B. Pinn. Read more about 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Bill Murry and Tony Pinn (with Video) »

Congratulations to Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray, 9th President of the UUA

We are very pleased to congratulate the Reverend Susan Frederick-Gray who was elected president of the Unitarian Universalist Association at General Assembly in New Orleans, LA. We look forward to your presidency and to working together to bring Unitarian Universalism to ever increasing heights of inclusion and impact. Read more about Congratulations to Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray, 9th President of the UUA »

Alison Miller’s Responses to Questions from the UU Humanist Association

Learn more about Alison Miller at the Alison Miller for UUA President website and Facebook page.

Question 1. How do you think UU congregations can reach those who identify as “nones,” including nones who wouldn’t identify themselves as spiritual? One idea the UU Humanist Association has launched is a “Freethinker Friendly” designation, specifying that individual UU congregations welcome those who identify themselves outside of traditional religions. How would you imagine that working? What other ideas do you have that tie UUism’s humanist roots with the growing number of people who identify as secular in America? Read more about Alison Miller’s Responses to Questions from the UU Humanist Association »

The Unitarian Universalist Association Becomes a March for Science Partner

The UU Humanist Association is very proud that the Unitarian Universalist Association has signed on as a March for Science partner, and is also mobilizing UUs to participate in the People's Climate March which will be held a week later, on April 29. The March for Science is a international movement, planning the main march in Washington DC, for Earth Day, April 22, 2017, as well as over 300 satellite marches around the world. As the March for Science website states,

The March for Science demonstrates our passion for science and sounds a call to support and safeguard the scientific community.

It is time for people who support scientific research and evidence-based policies to take a public stand and be counted.

One of the six sources for Unitarian Universalism is, "Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of science," and the UUA has never wavered in its support. Read more about The Unitarian Universalist Association Becomes a March for Science Partner »

Video: Listening to Humanist Voices

There is a new book on UU Humanism to be published by the UUA's Skinner House press this Fall, Humanist Voices in Unitarian Universalism. At General Assembly in Columbus, on Saturday, June 25th, there was a panel discussion about topics from the book. On the panel, seated left to right, were David Breeden, John Hooper, Maria Greene, Amanda Poppei, Kendyl Gibbons, and T. K.Barger.

This is the description of the session from the GA Program Book:

Authors from the new book, Humanist Voices in Unitarian Universalism (Skinner House, Ed. Kendyl Gibbons and Bill Murry), share their hopes for humanism. Can our humanist ancestry reach today’s “unaffiliated” and “spiritual but not religious?” What is the future of humanism in a spiritually pluralistic Unitarian Universalism?

Read more about Video: Listening to Humanist Voices »

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