From the Blog

The UU Humanists' Blog is a curated blog -- this means we highly encourage members and those with an interest in Humanism within the Unitarian Universalist tradition to submit articles for publication. The blog is curated so we may negotiate edits for clarity or length and we reserve the right to not publish every submitted article.

This means that the blog's content reflects the diversity of the opinions of the authors and is not just the "official party line" of the Association. As Humanists, we welcome diversity of opinion and encourage civil discourse through comments on these posts and on our social media pages.

Why Are UU Humanists Overlooked?

Over breakfast this morning, my husband told me about an interesting NY Times article that I should read, "It mentions your UU Humanist organization," he added. I was skeptical, but I thought perhaps I had missed something since I had been busy all day yesterday at a memorial for a cousin and hadn't even glanced at social media. After a quick scan of my Facebook news feed, I concluded he meant this article, "Wanted: A Theology of Atheism", by Molly Worthen. After reading it, I could see why he thought that it had something to do with UU Humanism. Worthen writes, "Humanist fellowships have often imitated the practices of traditional worship. Sunday Assembly’s close relative, the Society for Ethical Culture, has featured rousing music and a lecture at Sunday meetings since 1876." When one encounters the phrase "Humanist fellowships", free association usually causes the phrase "Unitarian Universalism" to come to mind to the initiated. Read more about Why Are UU Humanists Overlooked? »

Apply Now to The Humanist Institute

What is The Humanist Institute and why should you consider applyinging to join the new class, starting in August? As they say on the website, "Find out what you don’t know about Humanism". Here is more detail:

The Humanist Institute offers a Certificate in Humanist Studies. Students are enrolled in a small class (a maximum of 15 people) convening for eight sessions over two and half years. Classes meet in March, August and November. Prior to and in-between sessions, students prepare for class sessions through independent distance study and online discussion guided by the Assistant Dean and faculty.

Year One

The Humanist Institute does allow individuals to take just one year of it’s graduate-level program. This option allows students to gain an understanding of the Humanist life stance, values, and principles as well as Humanism in relation to others.

As our movement grows, we need more people with the skills needed to advocate for Humanism and become community leaders. Now may be the time for you to take on the challenge. Read more about Apply Now to The Humanist Institute »

The Thinking Atheist's Perspective on Unitarian Universalism

It's always interesting to hear an outside perspective on Unitarian Universalism. Seth Andrews, host of The Thinking Atheist podcast, did a podcast called The Unitarians, on March 3. (You can pick it up at 7:15 if you're only interested in the actual topic.)

Seth interviewed UUHA board member David Breeden, minister at First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis, as well as Mike Werner, author of "Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA", a book published by the UU Humanists, and others.

Please give it a listen. What did you think? Was it a fair overview of UU? And specifically, what did you think of Seth's conclusion? Read more about The Thinking Atheist's Perspective on Unitarian Universalism »

A Humanist Take on Meaning and Purpose

Have you ever felt like you go through the motions every day but it all seems meaningless? Did you know that you can use science to help you find a sense of life purpose? Wait, but science can’t answer life’s big questions – that’s the job of religion, right? Well, a wave of recent research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and other disciplines has explored how we find meaning and purpose in life, with or without belief in a deity!

I wish I knew that when I was growing up. I struggled with gaining a sense of life meaning and purpose throughout my teenage years and young adulthood. I remember experiencing the sense of meaninglessness as an emptiness deep in the pit of my stomach. Read more about A Humanist Take on Meaning and Purpose »

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