publications

When Colorblindness Isn't The Answer -- A Discussion Guide

Anthony Pinn’s new book, When Colorblindness Isn’t The Answer: Humanism and the Challenge of Race (order your copy today at Pitchstone Publishing or Amazon), provides an instructive manual for humanists seeking to bridge the gap between humanist theory and praxis when it comes to racial justice. You can read a book review here. Read more about When Colorblindness Isn't The Answer -- A Discussion Guide »

Call for Papers on Naturalism

Submissions on the subject of "Naturalism" are sought by UU Humanists for the Spring, 2016 issue of the Journal of Religious Humanism, to be mailed to UU Humanist Association members and subscribers in May, and distributed at the 2016 UUA General Assembly in Columbus, OH., in June.  Opinion pieces or short essays should be in the 800-1500 word range; a 3,000 word limit and a request for footnotes apply to longer articles of a more scholarly nature. Those submitting sermons are asked to convert to a suitable form for print publication, including citations, and the removal of protected text, such as complete hymn lyrics. Writers may submit completed pieces for consideration, or receive a preliminary decision on publication by sending an abstract. Read more about Call for Papers on Naturalism »

The Fall 2015 Issue of the Journal: The Threading the Interfaith/Interpath Needle

The Fall 2015 issue of the Journal of Religious Humanism has now been delivered to active members' mailboxes and/or Inboxes.

Humanism is so often described as being in opposition to, or at best in a creative tension with religion, that the path of interfaith cooperation can seem highly problematic, and perhaps more trouble than it is worth. Yet increasingly, individuals and Humanist groups join with their religious counterparts on specific social justice and service projects, and simply to further the goal of living side by side, even if in an uneasy peace. The fall 2015 issue of the Journal of Religious Humanism explores these efforts from several points of view - from the humanist organizations that have embraced particular events and coalitions, to individuals of many persuasions who have struggled with what it means to work and celebrate with those whose basic perspective on life is very different. Read more about The Fall 2015 Issue of the Journal: The Threading the Interfaith/Interpath Needle »

Journal Article: Brave, Clean, and Reverent?

By Dave Hunter, originally published in the journal "religious humanism", Vol. 44, No. 1. 

 

In which Pooh and Piglet explore the 100-acre wood and the meaning of reverence. (apologies to A.A. Milne)

Pooh and Piglet are out for a walk.

Pooh: Christopher Robin wants me to join the Cub Scouts.

Piglet: What’s that?

Pooh: It’s sort of a club for young bears; they do things together.

Piglet: Sounds like fun.

Pooh: But you have to learn stuff.

Piglet: Like what?

Pooh: Like what is reverence.

They continue walking, quietly, then Pooh says:

Pooh: Piglet, we’re in the 100-acre wood.

Piglet: Why, so we are. Look at those trees.

Pooh: They’re so tall, I can’t see the tops of them.

Piglet: How do they make you feel?

Pooh: I don’t know. They’ve always been here. They’ll always be here. They’re awesome. I’m humbled. I’m speechless.

Piglet: Did you know that the trees provide homes for birds and bumble bees and badgers?

Pooh: What good trees. I just want to say thank you.

Piglet: How would you feel if someone wanted to cut them all down? Read more about Journal Article: Brave, Clean, and Reverent? »

UUA President Morales on Science and the Search for Meaning

Unitarian Universalist Humanists will be very encouraged by reading UUA President Peter Morales' recent article "Science and the Search for Meaning," published in last summer's issue of The New Atlantis.  Peter forcefully reaffirms the Unitarian Universalist principle: "we affirm and promote a free and responsible search for truth and meaning." The entire essay could be interpreted as a thoughtful explication of our Unitarian Universalist Humanist Association (HUUmanists) core values of Reason, Compassion, and Community. Thanks, Peter.  We needed that!

Here are Peter Morales' words:

 

Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA

The HUUmanists Association is proud to announce the availability of the latest book from the Religious Humanism Press, Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA, by Michael Werner. Mike is an ardent Humanist and Unitarian Universalist having been past President of the American Humanist Association, Vice President of the Fellowship of Religious Humanists, President of the Humanist Foundation, President of the Unitarian Church of Charlotte, a founder of SMART recovery, and an adjunct faculty member of the Humanist Institute. He supports a balanced Humanism of heart and mind, reason and compassion and a Unitarian Universalism that helps us discover how to be more fully human.

Here is what some people are saying about the book:

“In this book Mike Werner analyzes what is wrong with the UUA and suggests how we can correct our problems and become once again a vital and growing religious movement.  It should be read by every UU who cares about the future of our Association.”  
-- William R. Murry, Former President and Dean, Meadville Lombard Theological School

"Religious Humanism" Journal – Next Issue

Appling Science to Theology

...is the theme running through the upcoming Spring 2013 issue of the Journal of Religious Humanism.  Papers delivered by Mark Belletini on Carl Sagan’s “Cosmic Theology,” and by Dawn Cooley on “Astrobiology” were delivered at last fall's Ohio River Group, a study gathering for UU Ministers.  Responses by their colleagues Lisa Friedman and Lisa Doege are included.

Mark Edmiston-Lange explores the extent to which evolution forms and teaches us about modern belief and religious life, and we reprise Sarah Voss’ “Matheology” - and evocation of “Cantorian Religion,” from an issue of RH about a decade ago.  Finally, since there are only two kinds of poetry that I like - the kind that rhymes and the kind that doesn’t, I included Roger Rochester’s thoughtful piece of doggerel on placing the human story in a larger context.

Volume 43, #2 will be mailed to members in July, and will be available for distribution at the General Assembly in Louisville, KY, June 19-22. Read more about "Religious Humanism" Journal – Next Issue »

Notes on the Religious Humanism Press

Becoming More Fully Human as eBook

Bill Murry’s book Becoming More Fully Human: Religious Humanism as a Way of Life, published in 2011, is building an ever wider following and is now available in digital form by arrangement with the Humanist Press (American Humanist Association).  The web site is www.humanistpress.com.

Upcoming Volumnes

Our next volume, Mike Werner’s Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA, is currently in preparation for the press, and we expect to have copies for display at our exhibit booth at the coming General Assembly.  It’s the first in a projected series entitled “Voices of Diversity,” intended to call forth much-needed conversations about issues too often ignored, or possibly even thought by some to be too controversial for open discussion.  Read more about Notes on the Religious Humanism Press »

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